Photos: Kathmandu after the quake

Photos: Kathmandu after the quake

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It’s been nearly two months since the 7.8 earthquake (and subsequent aftershocks) hit Nepal, killing more than 8,500 people and injuring more than 23,000 others. Homes, entire villages, and many UNESCO World Heritage sites, including parts of Durbar Square in Kathmandu, were destroyed.

But what many travellers might not realise is, despite the damage, Nepal is open to visitors. On June 15, numerous historic sites, including Durbar Square, re-opened to the public, and local authorities want to welcome travellers back to Nepal. Tourism is one of Nepal’s largest sources of income and employs about 5% of the total population — travelling to Nepal and putting money back into the local economy is one of the best ways we can help the country rebuild.

Our Urban Adventures in Kathmandu and Pokhara are still operating. As well, our sister company, Intrepid Travel, will be donating all profits from its 2015/16 Nepal trips to on-the-ground projects supported by its not-for-profit organisation, The Intrepid Foundation.

Here’s a peek into life in Kathmandu after the quake.

Kathmandu after the quake

A monk walks through the Swoyambhunath area. This area is one of the biggest Buddhist pilgrimage sites.

Kathmandu after the quake

The beautiful Boudhanath stupa has suffered some damage but remains mostly intact.

Kathmandu after the quake

Repairs are being done to spire of the Boudhanath stupa.

Kathmandu after the quake

Despite the damage, Bhaktapur Durbar Square has been busy after the earthquake.

Kathmandu after the quake

This still intact Buddha statue can be found on the stairway that takes you to the top of the Swoyambhunath Stupa (commonly known as the Monkey Temple).

Kathmandu after the quake

A crowd of people explore the Patan area after it re-opens to the public.

Kathmandu after the quake

Locals gather in Bhaktapur, an ancient city in the Kathmandu Valley that’s famed for its historic monuments. Sadly, many of those monuments have since been destroyed.

Kathmandu after the quake

A local vendor awaits customers in the newly re-opened Patan Durbar Square.

Kathmandu after the quake

A local feeds the pigeons in the Boudhanath area.

Kathmandu after the quake

While much of Patan Durbar Square in the Lalitpur District was destroyed, many structures still stand. This district is known as the city of art.

Kathmandu after the quake

Women worship at the idol of Lord Bishnu at the entrance to the National Art Museum in Bhaktapur. The museum was closed after the quake due to excessive cracks in the building’s walls.

Kathmandu after the quake

Patan Durbar Square is once again welcoming visitors into the area.

Kathmandu after the quake

Locals worship at the idol of Kal Bhairab in Kathmandu’s Durbar Square area.

Kathmandu after the quake

Just as beautiful as before, Pashupatinath Temple and the surrounding area is intact and remains a spiritual hub for Hindus from around the world.

Kathmandu after the quake

Thamel, one of the main tourist neighbourhoods, is open and awaiting visitors.

Kathmandu after the quake

The golden gate of Bhaktapur is revered for its artistic beauty. The 17th century gate holds great historical and religious significance, and has a fame unmatched by other Nepal monuments.

Kathmandu after the quake

The main stupa area is intact even after the earthquake.

Kathmandu after the quake

Tourist and locals have been steadily returning to Patan Durbar Square.

Kathmandu after the quake

Locals practice their Kora (the religious circling of the stupa) after the earthquake, even as renovations continue on the damaged spire of Boudhanath Stupa.

To date, The Intrepid Foundation has raised nearly AUD 400,000 with its Nepal Earthquake Appeal, and hopes that profits from tours booked will help push that number to $1 million.

Going to Nepal? We’re still operating tours in both Kathmandu and Pokhara.

About author
Profile photo of Bipin Raj Tiwari

Bipin Raj Tiwari

Tour leader and coordinator @ Kathmandu and Pokhara Urban Adventures. Traveller, passionate photographer, cyclist, and cultural explorer.

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